Items filtered by date: January 2021

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Items filtered by date: January 2021

History of the Solar Nebula from Paleomagnetism

The solar system formed about 4.6 billion years ago. During that time, left-over materials of gas and dust orbited the proto-Sun and formed a disk known as the “solar nebula”. Through a sequence of growth by coagulation and accretion, dust in the solar nebula eventually grow to form our planetary system. The solar nebula is the counterpart of “protoplanetary disks”, which are commonly found around other young stars in the Milky Way. Magnetic fields are known to play a crucial role in the formation, evolution, and dynamics of protoplanetary disks, and hence the processes of planet formation. Currently, attempts to directly measure or infer magnetic field from protoplanetary disks from astronomical observations have been unsuccessful. On the other hand, ancient meteorites have the potential to record the magnetic field in the solar nebular when they formed, which can be deciphered from techniques in the field known as paleomagnetism.

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